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  • 31

Accident: Ethiopian B787 at Addis Ababa on Mar 4th 2016, nose gear collapsed at gate

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An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 787-800, registration ET-ASH performing flight ET-702 from Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) to Rome Fiumicino (Italy), had completed boarding and was about to depart when the aircraft settled on its nose after the nose gear collapsed. One flight attendant received minor injuries, the aircraft received substantial damage. (avherald.com) Más...

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Dl8698
David Loh 3
Very interesting that this happened so soon after an almost identical incident of nose gear collapse at a different airlines? Don't people read the news and learn something?
dtw757
mike SUT 2
Standard airline procedures for nearly all airlines are that the gear pins are pulled before the pilot doing the preflight goes back into the cockpit. If gear pins are installed, it requires a logbook entry saying they are installed and another signing them off when they are removed so that the aircraft doesn't accidentally takeoff with them installed, preventing a retraction and a return to airport. The only pin that is used during pushback is a steering bypass pin that the pushback crew inserts which has nothing to do with the gear locks, but allows the nosewheel to turn (against hydraulic pressure) when required by the tug. Because of this, my guess id that the overcenter lock might have been misaligned somewhere in the process of extension, taxiing (who knows) and the gear just collapsed. If you think about it...the aircraft is traveling in a forward direction exerting pressure in an aft direction on the gear and could conceivably keep the gear "locked. Once brakes are released and an aft motion and pressure is put on the nose wheel, it all comes apart and collapses. JMHO
Dl8698
David Loh 3
Pardon me but you did read the part of the report that says the engineer put the gear lever up without first installing the lock pins? In any case the overcenter lock link will have big springs pulling the link towards lock so to unlock due to push back forces is not very likely. It uses a small hyd actuator to overcome the spring force and move the link to unlock and thus allow the gear to retract. The lock pin we all are referring to is the pin that is inserted into the lock link to stop it from unlocking. EVEN WHEN hyd pressure is on and the gear lever is moved to up. The B737 is the only jet airliner that I know of that is pushed back with this lock pin inserted and removed after push back
thecohorts
Matt LaMay 1
I have pushed hundreds of 737's before, but we never used lock pins. Just a bypass pin.
Dl8698
David Loh 1
Where i work the B737 has 2 pins inserted for pushback. 1 is a long pin inserted in the lock link. Other pin is the bypass pin. However I have not worked on B737 for a number of years. The last I worked on were the dash 400 B737. Perhaps the later series do not use the down lock pins for push back
ysfsim
Ant Miraa 1
No the next gens still have them. Only one airline at my airport uses then gear pin. Another one uses it also only for tows.
dtw757
mike SUT 1
As a post comment...that steering bypass pin is pulled following pushback so the flight crew can have nose wheel steering back; again it has nothing to do with gear extension or retraction.
Dl8698
David Loh 2
Probably the flt crew had already put the hyd pumps on in preparation for push back. Message appeared. Engineer came along and put gear lever to up. Just like that? Wow! No second thought about possibility of gear retracting? According to the report the FO tried to stop the enginneer from breaking the plane but enginner was too fast.
Normal procedure I follow when crew is already set up for departure is to give them a short briefing as to what i intend to do to the cockpit controls. Not just grab any control and move it to any other position without prior warning. Perhaps FO might have opportunity to warn against this occurance if the engineer had done the same.
rapidwolve
rapidwolve 1
Thank you for reading what I read...Im just glad Im not that engineer/mechanic causing a bird to fall on its nose.
kinoworks
Two months old. Why bother.
elsidd
Dennis Gillman 1
Remember the DC-10 that the ground handlers beat the handle to the closed position with a board, anything can be broken with enough force!
Dl8698
David Loh 1
Gear downlock pins - for preventing inadvertent gear folding. Usually removed BEFORE push back. Except for the B737 as far as I am aware. Taking off with this pin still installed has happened before!
Steering bypass pin - to allow the nose gear to be turned by the tow bar when towing or pushing back. Usually left installed till after pushback when it is removed. The 2 pins serve different functions and need to be removed at different stages of departure.
MIKESWICK
MIKE SWICK 1
wow expense of repair is just tip of cost imagine this bird out of commission not making revenue for couple of months
rallypoint
Arnold Fishman 1
Reminds me of a great ole British made movie called No Highway in the Sky ©1950's featuring Jimmy Stewart. Jimmy is not a pilot in this one but an introverted aeronautical engineer trying to prove a point about a new plane....wont give the rest away. Lots of famous actors and actresses in it. Overall, some really great acting and dialog (some plane in the sky scenes kind of cheesy). but wonderful in B/W. WATCH IT!
Bobqat
Bob Harrington 1
Ah, yes... The oh-so-beautiful 'Reindeer'!
drjquinn
Dr John Quinn 1
Brand-new bird. Nose-gear collapse... How is this possible?
williambaker08
william baker 1
Sounds like to me and looks like that someone didn't leave the nose push pin in while getting ready to push the aircraft out of the gate. It may also be that the Brakes were still on and this caused the nose wheels to lock up and the landing gear to fail.
btweston
btweston 1
If that's the case this is a pretty friggin' flimsy plane.
williambaker08
william baker 1
It's not that it's flimsy. You try pushing a aircraft away from the gate that is fully loaded with a tug cart. They put pins in for a reason to keep them locked into place. That's all this looks like is someone pulled the pin. The pin design is on 95% of all commercial and freight aircraft.
dtw757
mike SUT 1
See my above statement....if an aircraft needs pins to pushback, it's going to need them to taxi then...the forces and weight are all the same. The only pin installed for pushback is the steering bypass pin. Thats why the overcenter locks are designed into them and why 5000 psi hydraulic pressure (787..3000PSI most other commercial jets) is required to overcome the protection so they can retract.
williambaker08
william baker 1
I never said what pin it was I just said a pin.
williambaker08
william baker 1
Ok so I stand corrected. I used push pin but I was using in a term of the pin used during push back not taxi.
Dl8698
David Loh 1
The pin fitted during pushback is to bypass steering. It is ANOTHER pin that is fitted to prevent gear folding and this pin IS REMOVED before push back. There is no pin fitted to prevent gear folding during push back. However the engineer should have fitted this pin BEFORE moving the gear lever to up
rapidwolve
rapidwolve 1
Nose gear lock pins removed prior to push back, gear warning occurred, engineer/mechanic didnt replace lock pins prior to cycling the gear lever to see if that removed the warning, and bird falls down on its nose...glad Im not that mechanic!
drjquinn
Dr John Quinn 1
Any idea in which direction collapse occurred? If forward (from being towed out), wouldn't that go against the direction of retraction? And how can the presence/ control of such a critical issue be dependent on an elective decision?
dalbers
Dwight Albers 0
By the way though, it is a B-787-8. There is no such thing as a B-787-800.... :)
tcmarks
Tim Marks -2
Did anyone look closely at the photo? That is not a 787, it looks like a 737NG - no winglets and tucked-up engine pylons. Looks like someone tried to sensationalize a 737 failure into a 787 event.
grmaidens
George Maidens 2
Definitely a 787. Tail is wrong shape for 737, and cockpit windows a different shape.
williambaker08
william baker 3
This is a 787 not a 737.
williambaker08
william baker 3
Even if you zoom in the engine cowling has the ridge affect the 787 does. No other plane has that design of a engine cowling.
Bobqat
Bob Harrington 2
The new 747-8 engine cowlings have the same sawtooth, he added, unhelpfully... ;^}

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