Back to Squawk list

Missing Malaysia Airlines plane communication systems were disabled

Enviado
 
The communications systems of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 were deliberately disabled, Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak has said. (www.bbc.com) Más...

Sort type: [Top] [Newest]


TXCAVU
Just read this. Question now: is this a dry run for a larger event.
lolia
lolia 1
Exactly what I think
canuck44
canuck44 0
Not exactly a "dry" run as we do not know the ending yet.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Since everybody else has offered an opinion here, I'll venture mine and will say that I suspected intervention ever since it made that controlled flight & turn last week. I think it has been hijacked by that militant Muslim group in western China that wants a breakaway state and that the searching is either a cover for negotiations on the pax or buying time to plan an Entebbe` type raid to rescue them.
PhotoFinish
PhotoFinish 1
Funny you suggest that possibility.

Based on the satellite pings, they've isolated two narrow strips where the plane was last located.

1) the first is in the far southern Indian Ocean west of Australia. This is where the US is deploying assets to look for the plane or signs of its' presence.

2) The second is another strip north of the Indian Ocean over land that may include parts of China where these Muslim separatists are active.

The news report indicated that officials suggested the southern strip was more likely. But as they reported that, I considered the possibility of what you speculate here.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Well, they making a deal of the "Alright, good night" given to the malay controller and the fact that the transponder was off. In most cases, the departing controller would probably not ask for a squawk and on a slow nite, nothing would have been said. They apparently never contacted or entered Vietnamese air space. Under normal conditions, the Vietnamese controller would have probably started looking for him. Late on a Saturday nite/early on a Sunday morning, probably wouldn't have raised an eyebrow, and the handoff itself can be a big question. They would have the plane coming into their airspace, but it might not be told by the malay center,; it could be up to the crew, which in this case, it was never made.
PhotoFinish
PhotoFinish 1
It was reported from early on that the Vietnanese center tried to raise the plane. Then they asked another nearby plane (heading to Japan) to try and reach them.

It was the Vietnamese that reported the lost radar contact to the Malaysians in that first hour of flight.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
I think your theory is a reasonable one. My theory new theory is...Somalia has graduated from hijacking ships to hijacking jets. That change came after reading that the jet flew on for 7 hrs. I can think of only a couple of countries that would allow a landing. Somalia, Mayanmar, Yemen, Iran. All are on or beyond the edge of the jet's range at 7 hours. The last known headings show the jet heading west.
preacher1
preacher1 1
I had thought about that too. Now there is fairly solid word that the U.S. is sending a couple of spook subs, as well as the Kidd, into the Southern part of the Indian Ocean, to check out a fairly large target detected by satellite. That would tend to lend things toward another pilot suicide. I really don't think hijackers would take over the plane and then fly it til it ran out of gas, but who knows. The rat in that woodpile is the erratic altitude changes reported earlier in the flight.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
Question for you. It is a little under 4000 miles from Kuala Lampur to Mogadishu. Add in about 500 more for the diversion. Is that within range of a 777 with 7 hours of fuel, including reserve?
preacher1
preacher1 1
It would be well within range on full fuel, but it is only about 2800 miles or so to Bejing. They were planning on a 5.5 hour flight, give or take a few, and that would figure at about 500 mph or so. Even with diversion, reserve, and reduced speed, that would be a stretch, in particular as the winds would probably be headwind variety.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
That was my thinking, but I wanted to hear it from a pilot. Now, on with the conspiracy theory. You suppose someone, a fueler, in Kuala Lampur could sneak extra fuel on board? Wouldn't take a lot, maybe 500-1000 gallons. Of course, the crew would be aware of it, but hell. This is a conspiracy of some sort, anyway.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Well, this whole thing has been thought out well in advance by somebody; there ain't no telling. It could have been that the Captain took on extra fuel if he was in on it and it just hasn't been reported yet by MAS. I just really have a hard time of him being in on a hijack type situation though.

Outa here for awhile. Any reply later.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
FO, maybe. Captain, no.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
Oops, sorry about the double word.
preacher1
preacher1 1
Didn't really notice it until you mentioned it. LOL
lolia
lolia 1
Knew it. The real question is, where is it? I don't believe it has crashed.
whip5209
Ken McIntyre 1
Somalia
WALLACE24
WALLACE24 0
Hijacked by David Copperfield.
TXCAVU
Shame on you.
WALLACE24
WALLACE24 1
Right now Copperfield is viable. Lol
JerrySteinberg
(Duplicate Squawk Submitted)

Malaysian Official: Missing Plane Was Hijacked

One week after a Malaysia Airlines jet with 12 crew members and 227 passengers from 15 countries went missing, officials are now saying that they the aircraft was indeed hijacked...

http://www.frequentbusinesstraveler.com/2014/03/malaysian-official-missing-plane-was-hijacked/

Entrar

¿No tienes cuenta? ¡Regístrate ahora (gratis) para acceder a prestaciones personalizadas, alertas de vuelos, y más!