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  • 36

Stratolaunch set to fly

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Stratolaunch, the launch venture created by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, took the world’s biggest airplane out of its hangar this weekend (www.geekwire.com) Más...

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jmilazzo
joe milazzo 4
I would love to know what the flight deck looks like. I assume that due to the nature of its mission, it wont need to be IFR certified or need anything more than a simple navigation system.
royhunte92
Roy Hunte 3
Found the answer on nasaspaceflight.com.
will be powered by six 46,000-66,500 lbf thrust-range jet engines, that are planned to be sourced from two used 747-400s that have already been purchased. These planes will be cannibalized not just for their engines, but also the avionics, flight deck, landing gear and other proven systems that can be recycled to cut development costs.
nofossil70
nofossil70 3
Needs IFR to fly in class A airspace
royhunte92
Roy Hunte 2
Due to the nature of the task assigned to stratolaunch and the area it need to operate in, it would have to be IFR certified and a standard large aircraft navigation system. What I wonder is if it will fall into the 'Super Heavy' category with the A380 or if it will just be in the 'Heavy' category. Will wait and see.
Michel0
Michel B. 1
I know the category is based of the total weight (payload and aircraft) but i don't know what is the required weight to be categorized "super". The "heavy" are 160,000 lbs and + if my memory don't failed me.
SkyVoice
SkyVoice 4
Whew! I think that a quote from the late, great Yogi Berra summed up feeling for this gigaplane years ago when he said, "The future ain't what it used to be!"
dabeed
Dave Fisher 4
Yeah, but if you come to a fork in the road, take it!
dabeed
Dave Fisher 1
WWII F-82
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAd6t_On4rQ
raymondwatson
raymond watson 1
Awesome would love to see it but live in uk so not possible
paulgilpin1953
paul gilpin 1
i wonder if there are any stresses in the "beam" that connects the two hulls?
probably not.
rartac
Robert Artac 1
My thoughts exactly. Not to mention harmonics between the two hulls. Doesn't look sound at all.
dabeed
Dave Fisher 1
here's the WWII era F-82
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAd6t_On4rQ
skylab72
skylab72 1
All structures have stresses. You would have to research a significant part of Scaled Composites history to learn all the dynamic stress control techniques they have developed and adapted for use on this aircraft. Suffice it to say they chose the one wing two fuselages layout several design iterations ago and it is well proven.
bobkeeping
Bob Keeping -1
Windows has had tens of thousands or exploitable flaws. Is this aircraft any different?

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